top of page

Ten Suggestions for Strengthening Staff Weak Links

52422521_245343642932946_7767836374436510622_n
  1. Offer some understanding: Assume everyone has the skills for their jobs even though they're not demonstrating them.

  2. If their non-performance makes you angry, don't go in hot. Cool down before confronting them.

  3. Don't let things fester. The longer you allow less-than-able work, the more disruptive it becomes, which ultimately reflects on you and the rest of the team.

  4. Don't assume the person in question has a clue what you're talking about when you confront them with their failing. If their work was considered okay by their former leader, they may have no idea why suddenly it's a problem for you. Don't be oblique. Explain how their work needs to change.

  5. On the other hand, be reasonable. Change isn't easy. Give them time to make changes, but be sure to circle back.

  6. Reinforce and compliment staff when their work style changes for the better.

  7. If your museum has an HR department, pull them into the discussion especially if change isn't happening the way you'd like it to.

  8. Make sure staff understand where they fit in your department, program or museum structure. Do they have performance goals? Are those reviewed annually?

  9. If you've tried everything else, be ready to let someone go. Remember there's nothing more demoralizing for other team members, than watching someone--whether staff or volunteer-- fail to commit to the museum mission.

  10. And last, always question yourself first: Were you clear in your expectations? Did everyone get the same information, training and opportunities or is there bias in the way?Joan Baldwin Image: Savannah State University Professor Nicholas Silberg leading Coastal Heritage Society Interpretive Staff.

Comentários


Featured Posts
Recent Posts
Archive
Search By Tags
Follow Us
  • Facebook Basic Square
  • Twitter Basic Square
  • Google+ Basic Square
bottom of page