"Must-reads" from 2020!


2020 is nearly over! As you look back and reflect on the year, check out some of the GEMM Steering Committee’s “must-reads” and "must-listens" from the past few months.

Worldwide Optimism About Future of Gender Equality, Even as Many See Advantages for Men

Insightful data and international perspectives, gathered by Pew Research Center, surveying 34 countries on components of gender equity. Great visuals and reader friendly charts/graphics.

--Andrea Crivello

Pandemic Will ‘Take Our Women 10 Years Back’ in the Workplace

The myth of “having it all” for working moms has certainly been exposed this year. There’s plenty to be pessimistic about, but let’s keep our eyes on the prize, friends: the revolution will have childcare!

--Marieke Van Damme

Robin DiAngelo, White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism - DiAngelo's book has been dissed of late, but I think it's a good starting point for some white people to begin their journey of understanding race relations in the US.


Ibram S. Kendi, Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America - This is a must read if you want to wrap your head around the full course of racist history; there's a lot to absorb, but important to do so.

--Anne Ackerson

The year 2020 has surely tested our collective resilience in the face of a global pandemic and compassion toward one another. Here is a selection of articles that explore where we are at this extraordinary moment in time:

NASA Names Headquarters After ‘Hidden Figure’ Mary W. Jackson

Feminine wisdom: A look at what women said in a year like no other

The Global Fight for Black Lives

Ongoing pandemic forcing moms out of workforce

Group Seeking Equality for Women in Tech Raises $11 Million


For much-needed lighter news:

Barcelona opera opens for first concert since coronavirus shut down with audience of plants

103-year-old Massachusetts woman beats coronavirus, celebrates with Bud Light

--Diana Murphy

If you don’t already follow Not Your Momma's History on social media, it’s well worth adding to your feed. Cheyney McKnight, the founder and owner, is an amazing museum educator and historical interpreter. Follow the Facebook page, visit her website, and support her work on Patreon. Learn more online here: http://www.notyourmommashistory.com


A data trove I have revisited throughout this past year is The Gender Action Portal from the Women and Public Policy Program at the Harvard Kennedy School. It provides a great list of gender focused data resources and summaries of research about Leadership, Decision-Making, and COVID-19 and Parents, Motherhood, and COVID-19. The website can be explored online here: https://gap.hks.harvard.edu/gap-covid19


Zoom fatigue is real, but many places have pivoted very well virtually with online exhibitions and events. I have enjoyed watching Artemisia: Curator-led exhibition at the National Gallery London, viewing the virtual events for the Know My Name: Australian Women Artists 1900 to Now at the The National Gallery of Australia, and virtually wandering the exhibit Becoming Vanderbilt: An Exhibition at Rosecliff (Newport Mansions).

--Scarlett Hoey

white supremacy culture by Tema Okun

This list has examples of how white supremacy culture shows up in our organizations. Okun says "Culture is powerful precisely because it is so present and at the same time so very difficult to name or identify. The characteristics listed below are damaging because they are used as norms and standards without being pro- actively named or chosen by the group." I'm dedicating time to sitting with this and getting real with myself about which of these I perpetuate, and what work I'm going to do to dismantle them.

--Natasha Ransom (she / her)

Leadership Matters blog

When I read these posts, I feel like Joan is my personal leadership coach. She has a magic touch when it comes to talking about timely issues and sharing essential resources. I can't count how many times I have read the blog on a Monday only to have it answer questions that have been rolling around in my head or present just the exact resource I need for working with my board. Sometimes, her words are a kind kick in the ass reminding me I have work to do and sometimes they are a gentle hug reminding me these are difficult times. I couldn't lead without it!

The four part "When you worked at a Museum" series from incluseum

Since I spend most of my time preparing future museum professionals, I often feel anxious when students ask me about finding jobs during the pandemic. They may not want to hear it, but deep down I know I am not just preparing them for museum jobs. In fact, they are building skills that are highly transferable to many fields. This series reminds me of the value of museum work. We can apply our skills and talents to a wide range of creative and meaningful careers- beyond museums!

--Heidi Lung

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