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10 Tips for Addressing Toxic Staff

toxix
  1. First, know what you don't know: Who is the problem and how? How is your team, staff or program suffering? And most importantly, how and when has it impacted work? Has the individual in question suffered a life event that may be causing problem behavior? Can you offer time off or find them counseling? Will that help? And understand, in some cases, it won't.

  2. Have any legal lines been crossed? In other words, is the uncomfortable, disruptive behavior the result of harassment, workplace bullying or racist or gender-based stereotyping? If your museum has an HR department you may want to have a conversation about how to protect your employees, but also to make sure your actions don't make a bad situation worse. Know your state and federal law regarding workplace harassment. You can't force an employee to report harassment or bullying, but you can suggest it, and you and the victim should document what you've seen and/or experienced.

  3. Assuming no laws were broken, talk to the staff member(s) in question. And for the love of God, do not suggest they need to fix it themselves. Too often people are unaware how they present to others, and they may be genuinely surprised. So provide concrete workplace examples demonstrating where things went off track.

  4. Listen. Paraphrase, summarize, and reframe what you've heard.

  5. Be clear in your expectations. If you have an HR department, work with them to determine how to tie your expectations and needs to consequences. If you're dealing with someone with terrible time management issues, and they've asked to work from home a day a week, weigh that ask against their work load. Can they meet deadlines? What will happen if they don't? Do you have time to monitor them to make sure deadlines and check points are met?

  6. Don't say you expect X,Y, and Z, and then neglect to check in. 

  7. Document everything you do. Should you have to fire someone, your life will be its own special hell if you can't document what you say has happened.

  8. Remember you are not a counselor, psychologist or mediator, and most people don't change. That said, most of us would rather be happy than sad, and most enjoy feeling valued. A job well done, whether a short term project, or a years-long exhibit planning effort deserves the best team you can muster.

  9. Understand, the reason you're involved is because this person's behavior affects the whole workplace. Support other team members. Let them know they're valued. Try to help them collaborate without being caught up in whatever baddy-baddness is going on. Be the person who doesn't indulge in gossip.

  10. Don't forget about your own work. You're still a leader with a million things requiring your attention. Don't get so deep in the HR weeds you forget about leading.Joan Baldwin

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